The anatomy of a perfect run

9 Aug

First two miles. When I cut the television on above my treadmill, a triathlon was on. Not only that but I caught the last half of the program where they showed athletes in their 60s and 70s as well as people with artificial legs who were completing the race. Talk about motivation, piece of cake right out of the gate.

Second two miles. Pretty normal, grinding it out. This is the phase when I realize I am feeling good and begin dreaming about how far I can go. Coming into yesterday, I had run five miles exactly four times in my life; twice on past race days and twice about two weeks ago. I was pretty pumped to feel like I would hit five miles once again today

Fifth mile. Then it got tough. Really tough. I was frustrated and almost quit at four and a half, angry I was not going to make five miles again. The television was boring and I knew we had people coming over later so I felt like I had to get home. Unplugged from the television during the second half of this mile and switched over to music from my iPhone which sometimes helps.

Boy did it ever. I have heard runners talk about hitting a high, I would call it just plain feeling it, and right as I hit 4.75 miles on that little electronic counter, I felt it. Great wind. No pain anywhere. Enjoying the music. Then I began laughing at how good it felt and how surprised I was at how I felt.

When the laughter finally subsided, I had clocked seven miles. Very grateful to God for a healthy body that allows me to experience moments like that. Kinda like when I carded a best-ever 93 earlier this summer playing golf, I am a little hesitant to run again as I am certain it will not go quite as well.

I think I will, as soon as my legs stop burning just from walking.

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2 Responses to “The anatomy of a perfect run”

  1. ashbarnett August 10, 2010 at 2:23 pm #

    wait… twitter and blogging regularly?? whaaa?

    • Shane August 10, 2010 at 2:28 pm #

      You’ve been pretty busy yourself:)

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